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LAHM, Samuel
Landis, Christian, Sr.,Root, Nisley,Lehman, Martin
Landis, John L., Lehman
Landis, David D., Lehman
Lehman, Rev. Samuel D.,Hoover, Detwiller, Hunsecker, Hurst
Lehman, Daniel D., Bomberger
Linn, Hugh.,

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VI

LAHM, Samuel, representative, was born in Leitersburg, Md., April 22, 1812;
son of John Lahm, a native of Germany, a mechanic, innkeeper and farmer.
Samuel left home in 1830, and went to Franklin county, Pa., where he became a
clerk, but returned home on condition that his father should allow him to
attend school. In two years he acquired a good English education and taught
school. He attended Gettysburg academy and Washington college, Pa., for a
short time, and in October, 1835, he settled in the practice of law at
Canton, Ohio. He was master of chancery, 1837-41; prosecuting attorney for
Stark county, 1841-45; state senator, 1842-44; brigadier-general in the state
militia; an unsuccessful candidate for representative in the 29th congress
and a representative in the 30th congress, 1847-49. He was married in 1838 to
Aimira Webster, daughter of Daniel Brown of Portsmouth, N.H. After his
service in congress he retired from active politics, gave up his law practice
on account of a failure in his voice, and devoted the remainder of his life
to farming and sheep raising. He died in Canton, Ohio, June 16, 1876.

Submitted by: Sharon Lantzy Wygant SSchu22739@aol.com


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SOURCE: HISTORY OF FRANKLIN CO., PA, 1887, pge 781

CHRISTIAN LANDIS, Sr.,  farmer, P.O. Chambersburg, was born January 25, 1816,
in Dauphin County, Penn., and is a grandson of Henry LAndis, who was of Swiss 
descent, and many of whose descendents live in Lancaster and other counties in
Pennsylvania. John Landis, Henry's son, lived and died in Dauphin County,
eleven miles below Harrisburg. He married Elizabeth, a daughter of Jacob Root,
a Mennonite minster and a native of Switzerland. She died there at the age of
seventy years, the mother of three sons, and two daughters: John, Elizabeth,
Nancy, Christian and Moses. She had been previously married to John Nisley,
the father of Martin and Jacob Nisley. Christian Landis was educated in his 
native county, and came here when twenty-seven years old. He married in
December, 1845, Susannah Lehman, who died the mother of four sons:
John L., Daniel L., David D., and Christian L. Mr. Landis next married
Barbara Lehman, a sister of his first wife, and a daughter of Daniel
Lehman, a Mennonite preacher. Mr. Landis fiest bought 117 acres of land 
to which he added from time to time, but which has been divided, and now 
has about 230 acres. Christian L., our subject's son, was born April
29, 1859; was reared and educated here, and farms the homestead. He
married November 7, 1883, Miss Anna, the daughter of Jacob Martin,  
and they have one child, Adam Landis. In politics he is a Republican.

Submitted by Judy  (jlvj@epix.net

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SOURCE: HISTORY OF FRANKLIN CO., PA, 1887, pge 781

JOHN L. LANDIS,farmer, P.O. Chambersburg, was born December 9,
1846, in Green Township, this county, son of Christian Landis, a native of 
Dauphin County, Penn. He was educated in this county, and here married 
Miss Catherine Lehman, a daughter of Daniel Lehman, and to them were 
born the following named children: Anna, Lizzie, Amos, Daniel, Kate, Jacob,
Amandia, Rhoda, Harvey and Samuel. Mr. and Mrs. Landis are members of
the Mennonite Church. He owned over ninety-one acres of land in Greene
Township. In Politics he is a Republican.

Submitted by Judy  (jlvj@epix.net)

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SOURCE: HISTORY OF FRANKLIN CO., PA, 1887, pge 781

DAVID D. LANDIS, was born January 27, 1855 on the Landis homestead,
where his father, Christian Landis settled when a young man. He was educated
in his native county, and had devoted himself to farming pursuits all his
life. He married, November 18, 1875, Miss Martha, a daughter of Abraham
Lehman, and has three children: Abraham L., Rannie L., and Benjamin L.
Mr. Landis is identified with the Republican Party, to the principles of
which he strictly adheres.

Submitted by Judy  (jlvj@epix.net)

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SOURCE: HISTORY OF FRANKLIN CO., PA, 1887, pge 781-782

REV. SAMUEL D. LEHMAN, Chambersburg, was born March 27, 1831, on the 
old Lehman homestead, in Green Township, this county, where his father, Peter, 
settled after his marriage, and died August 31, 1875, aged seventy-six years.
Peter was born on the old homestead of his grandfather, Daniel Lehman
(who came to this county about ninety years ago), and which is now the
property of Christian Landis. Daniel was a son of Peter, a native of
Lancaster County, near Nanheim, Penn., where the great-great-grandfather
settled on his arrival from Switzerland. The family as far back as can
be traced were members of the Mennonite Church. Daniel Lehman married 
Nancy Hoover, who died at the age of eighty-seven years. She had 
nine children who reached maturity: Samuel, John, Daniel, Jacob, David,
Nancy, Elizabeth, Barbara, and Susannah. Daniel (the grandfather)
died in March. 1847, aged seventy years. He was a minister, for many years
in his chosen church, and always has an influence for good in the community 
in which he lived. He was an invalid the last ten years of his life,
having been injured by a horse. His son, Peter married Susan, daughter
of Jacob Detwiller. She died at the age of fifty-three years, mother 
of seven children: Nancy, Martha, Samuel D., Barbara, Daniel, John, and
Susannah. Samuel D., our subject, was educated in the schools of his 
neighborhood. He married,Miss Elizabeth, daughter of John Hunsecker,
and they have three children: Lydia, wife of Michael Hurst (she has
one son, Samuel Hurst); Peter and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Lehman are
active members of the Mennonite  Church. He was ordained a monster of
the gospel May 31, 1885, and follows in his grandsire's footsteps in the good work.

Submitted by Judy  (jlvj@epix.net

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SOURCE: HISTORY OF FRANKLIN CO., PA, 1887, pge 782

DANIEL D. LEHMAN (deceased) was born July 21, 1835, in Green 
Township, this county, the son of Peter Lehman. He was a farmer in early 
life and died on the old homestead, January 22, 1883, where he also was 
born. He owned 113 acres of land on which his widow still resides.
December 11, 1866, he married Miss Catharine Bomberger, who
was born September 2, 1838, near Shippensburg, Cumberland Co., Penn., a
daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Erb) Bomberger, of German descent. Mrs.
Lehman bore her husband three children: Joseoh E., Anna and Henry B.
Daniel Lehman was identied with the Minnonite Church all his life.
He did his duty everywhere and was well known and respected by all
who came in contact with him. 

Submitted by Judy  (jlvj@epix.net

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Hugh Linn
SOURCE: Email submitted by Lynneage@aol.com

This man lived in Franklin County, PA.  The attached bio includes some text 
quoted from the 1905 book "The Clan Linn" by Dr. George Wilds Linn.

HUGH LINN
Born in 1753, Hugh Linn lived for a time near Newry, County Down in Ulster,
Ireland. His roots were in Scotland, but whether he or one of his forbears
was the first Linn to live in Ireland is something which may never be
discovered. In 1788, Hugh brought his wife Sarah and three small children to
the new nation of America.
>Settling in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, Hugh was a farmer and helped to
found the village of Concord. He opened his home to people far and near for
worship, prayer, and Bible reading.  His cabin became known to those in the
surrounding countryside as Immanuel, meaning "God with us."  Hugh Linn and
his family lived a rugged, pioneer life sustained by faith in the Lord Jesus
Christ. The family closed each day together with the evening meal and
conversation, followed by scripture reading and prayer.  Many years after
Hugh was gone, his children having passed on the memory to their own
children, one of his grandsons shared the treasured scene with the fifth
generation.  The hearer, Dr. George Wilds Linn, recorded the scene thus:

"A bright and cheerful fire blazes on the spacious hearth, casting a ruddy
glow on the simply furnished but neat and tidy apartment called the kitchen.
A simple evening meal has been prepared, and father, mother and children sit
down to partake of it with keen and wholesome appetite.  A momentary silence
takes the place of the hum of voices and the playful laughter of little
ones.  Every head is reverently bowed, and the deep, strong voice of him who
in the old Anglo-Saxon language is known as the 'houseband' is lifted in
thankfulness to the Giver of all good for the sustenance which, like the
manna of Israel's children, comes to them day by day.
"Then while enjoying their simple fare, more than crowned heads do the
viands of palaces, the experiences of the day are recited, 'absent friends
are brought to mind,' and restful converse indulged in, blended with an
occasional gentle admonition to the children, whose exuberant spirits the
daylight hours have failed to subdue.  But notice -- when hunger has been
sated and the evening meal is ended, there is no haste to get away; even the
babe in arms, little Sarah, seems to recognize a coming calm.  The master of
the house reaches upward to the simple shelf made between the joists of the
unceiled room, and takes down a book, the 'Book of Books,' which is to them
an inspiration by day and by night, in sickness and in health, in prosperity
and in adversity.  Slowly and reverently he opens its lids, and turning its
well-worn leaves as if looking for some favorite selection, says, 'Let us
read a portion of God's Word, the One Hundred and Third Psalm,' and we hear
among other passages the following:
'Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless His holy name
. . . Who satisfieth thy mouth with good things so that thy youth is renewed
like the eagle's.  The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and of
great mercy. He hath not dealt with us after our sins, nor rewarded us
according to our iniquities. Like as a father pitieth his children so the
Lord pitieth them that fear Him. For He knoweth our frame, He remembereth
that we are dust . . . But the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to
everlasting upon them that fear Him, and His righteousness unto children's
children; and to those that remember His commandments to do them.  Bless the
Lord all His works, in all places of His dominion, bless the Lord, O my soul.'
"The book is then reverently closed as it had been opened, and all, in a
silence unbroken save by the voice of husband and father, kneel in prayer
before the King of kings.  The goodness and power of Deity are acknowledged,
the unworthiness of the suppliants confessed, the blessings of the day
recounted, the favor of heaven invoked upon all, and especially upon the
'lambs of the fold,' and the petition closes by commending all to God's care
for the night.  The remaining moments of the evening quickly pass in
preparation for sleep. The little ones, disrobed, kneel together about the
mother's lap, and slowly repeat in unison:
 'Now I lay me down to sleep,
 I pray the Lord my soul to keep;
 If I should die before I wake,
 I pray the Lord my soul to take.'
"They are then carefully tucked in the trundle bed and a good-night kiss
from mother closes the wearied eyelids in the dreamless sleep of childhood,
while she whispers:
 'The bairnies cuddle doon at night
 wi' mirth that's dear to me;
 But soon the big warl's cark and care
 will quaten doon their glee.
 Yet come what may to ilka ane,
 may he what rules aboon,
 Aye whisper though their pows be bauld,
 O, bairnies, cuddle doon.'
"[This] depicts a scene which was enacted day after day in and about
Concord, and the site of their settlement in America, for more than a
century, until the last of the name was called away from the old village by
death.  Who that has been brought up under such influences can ever lose the
spirit of reverence for Deity? . . . The descendants of the man who thus
worshipped God, scattered as they are all over our land, carry with them
(unconsciously though it be) an emanation of that spirit which in the olden
time met God face to face in that lonely cabin, and spake to Him as man
speaketh to his friend.

[Quoted text from Dr. George Wilds Linn's 1905 "The Clan Linn.")

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